How do you Read the Bible? by Corrinn Cobb

Every so often, I get an email from Relevant magazine.  I mostly pass it over as mainstream, Christian fluff that really is not all that ‘relevant.’  But this article struck me as it provided “9 Things Everyone Should do When Reading the Bible.” It was indeed number nine that got me: “Read to Study. But Also, Read to Refresh Your Heart. So I began thinking: Why do I read the bible? After sharing the post with a few friends, I realized that many of us felt obligated to read the Bible, and treat it like an undergrad, midterm examination.  We whip out the highlighters, study guides, commentaries, and so on.  When we do not understand the King James Version, we turn to NIV, American Standard, the Message…and yes, many of us carry all of the...

Read More

Interview with a Faith-Rooted Community Organizer by Corrinn Cobb

As part of the core curriculum of the MA Urban Studies – Community Development program, I am currently taking Community Organizing with Pastor Alexia Salvatierra. In a recent assignment, we were tasked with interviewing a local community organizer in our neighborhood.  I choose to interview one of my colleagues (D for the purposes of this article) and was pleasantly surprised to find that this colleague took on a very faith-rooted approach to organizing.  In her book, Faith-Rooted Organizing: Mobilizing the Church in Service to the World, Salvatierra and her colleague describe faith-rooted organizing as organizing guided by faith practices and principles. I share my colleague’s responses as to help others who may be struggling to organizing their...

Read More

Alum Update: Selma Nunes

Alum Update: Selma Nunes

Presently Selma works for Inova Health Systems, which is Northern Virginia’s leading not-for-profit healthcare provider, serving more than 1 million people each year. Currently she is a Program Developer who creates and run community health programs to help bridge faith base organizations and local non-profits together with the health system. One of my most important roles in my job is to build and sustain health ministries in low-income and under served communities in Northern Virginia. She does this by facilitating the implementation of strategic initiatives by training and supporting professional and congregational volunteers and church leadership. One of their training methods is coordinating with Wesley Theological Seminary to deliver high quality...

Read More

Key Facts about Child Labor by Corrinn Cobb

On Tuesday, October 7th, the US Department of Labor announced the release of the Bureau of International Labor Affairs’ annual assessment of global efforts to eliminate the worst forms of child labor.  The report, titled “2013 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor” examines more than 140 countries and their populations of child workers.  US Secretary of Labor, Thomas E. Perez, stated that the report “shines light on children around the globe who are being robbed of their futures.”  The report also suggests actions countries can take to reduce child labor and the deplorable conditions they work. Five key facts that the report highlighted include: A staggering number of children around the world are working in deplorable conditions. Child laborers...

Read More

Studies Show Working Class Experiences Inconsistent Work Schedules by Corrinn Cobb

In a recent study by researchers at the University of Chicago’s School of Social Service Administration, individuals in the working-class experience inconsistent work schedules at rates higher than most. The study found that individuals in blue-collar jobs, such as food service, janitorial positions, and retail were more likely to have unpredictable work schedules, often on a weekly basis.  This means that workers are unable to plan ahead and often have no input over their work schedules. For those with families, this inconsistency also affects children.  Work-hour fluctuations often requires parents to adjust their children’s schedules, from picking them up for school, arranging childcare, and even time for meals and homework. A household’s income is...

Read More

Economists say, ‘Build more roads!’ But to where and for whom? by Corrinn Cobb

Economists say, ‘Build more roads!’ But to where and for whom? by Corrinn Cobb

According to findings by the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, of 44 economic experts surveyed, 36 indicated they believe President Obama has underspent on infrastructure.  Those surveyed included professors from Harvard, MIT, Stanford, Princeton, Yale, and UChicago. Although the panelists had no clear consensus on the kind of infrastructure the U.S. should be investing in, most seemed to agree that building more roads, bridges, railways and airports would improve the economy. Tell that to your average Chicagoan. The city has seen no shortage of new roads, railways, and buildings being erected.  The Chicago Transit Authority completed a major reconstruction project of the southbound portion of the city’s main artery, the Red Line in 2013, and is...

Read More

Is Community Organizing a Calling? By Corrinn Cobb

Thus says the Lord of hosts, the God of Israel, to all the exiles whom I have sent into exile from Jerusalem to Babylon: Build houses and live in them; plant gardens and eat what they produce.  Take wives and have sons and daughtesr, take wives for your sons, and give your daughters in marriage, that they may bear sons and daughters, multiply there, and do not decrease.  But seek the peace of the city where I have sent you into exile, and pray to the Lord on its behalf, for in its peace you will find your peace. (Jeremiah 29:4-7). In examining the Israelite’s exile to Babylon, Robert Linthicum (2003) writes that although God was punishing Israel, there were also a set of conditions that they were expected to live by.  The Israelites were commanded to seek the...

Read More
  • Social Slider